Monday, April 11, 2016

A New Podcast on Macroeconomics



Today is the launch of a new podcast series on macroeconomics called Macro Musing and I am privileged to be the host. Each week, with the help of a special guest, we will get to explore in depth various macroeconomic topics. If want to go all wonky on macro this is the podcast for you! 

So far I have recorded podcasts with the following guests: Scott Sumner, John Taylor, John Cochrane, Cardiff Garcia, Miles Kimball, Ramesh Ponnuru, and George Selgin. There have been a lot of interesting conversations covering topics such as the origins of the Great Recession, the safe asset shortage problem, negative interest rates, the fiscal theory of the price level, the Eurozone Crisis, Abenomics, the Great Depression, China's economic problems, and alternative monetary regimes. In addition to these interesting topics, I have enjoyed learning how each guest got into macro, either as an academic or as an journalist, and how they see the field changing over time as new ideas and new technology emerge. I think you will find it fascinating too.

More guest are scheduled, including some Fed officials, but I would love to hear from you on what guests and topics you would like to see on the show. My first guest is Scott Sumner with whom I discuss his views on the Great Recession, NGDP targeting, and his new book on the Great Depression, The Midas Paradox.

I hope to make this a long-term project, but it success depends in part on you subscribing. So please subcribe via itunes or your favorite podcast app (update: here is the soundcloud link and here is the Stitcher link) and spread the word. Let's make this podcast a success together and who knows, maybe we can help make the world a better place. 

This podcast is part of the new Program on Monetary Policy (POMP) at the Mercatus Center at George Mason Univeristy. I am grateful for all their support in making the podcast happen.

Related Links for Scott Sumner
Retargeting the Fed
A Market-Driven Nominal GDP Target
The Great Depression
The Money Illusion

26 comments:

  1. maybe stupid, but only itunes? not possible to directly download mp3, or stitcher or smth else?

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    1. Here's the URL to subscribe to the podcast without using iTunes

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    2. Denis, the podcast is also available on SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/macro-musings

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    3. Denis, we do have a Stitcher page but currently there is a bug in it. Hope to have it fixed soon.http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=87214&refid=stpr

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    4. Okay, here is a working link for Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/david-beckworth/macro-musings?refid=stpr

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  3. Looking forward to your interview with Paul Krugman on the dearth of aggregate demand.

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  4. The market monetarist Macro Musing podcast: the MM MM podcast

    Very exciting!

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  6. Roger Farmer. Hands-down doing the most important work in macro currently. He's also far less ideological than your current list of guests who, other than Kimball, range from merely right-wing to far right-wing. Ponnuru isn't even an economist, though he did get consistently shellacked by Christopher Hitchens on religion.

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    1. Anonymous, great suggestion. He is already on list.

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    2. FWIW: I'd rather eat a toad for breakfast every day for the rest of my life than hear myself described as "right wing."

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    3. ...or "ideological," for that matter. My monetary economics ideology, such as it is, can be summed up as follows: I'm for stability and efficiency and agin their opposites.

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    4. Yes, George, I think anonymous will be surprised once he listens to your podcast and learns you favor stabilizing nominal demand. Also, anonymous may be shocked to hear John Cochrane's ringing endorsement of the fiscal theory of the price level. Anonymous may also be surprised at Ponnuru's command of monetary economics. Hopefully, all will find the show interesting.

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    5. If your policy prescriptions are conditional on the occupant of the White House, then you are purely ideological. (But George's insight on the Fed's IOR was a great one.)

      In the spirit of your OP, I would also suggest (unordered) Michael Woodford, Paul Romer, Paul Pfleiderer, Gauti Eggertsson, and Anat Admati. Professor Admati talking about basic balance sheet arithmetic is a pure tonic.

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    6. All great suggestions. Would be really thrilled to chat with Woodford and Eggertson especially. Will do my best to get them.

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  7. This is awesome! I would love to have Larry summers or Paul Krugman !!! Talk more about secular stagnation and current economic issuess!!!

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    1. Yes, would really like to land them on the show too. I will try!

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  8. Guest idea: the brilliant Nick Rowe!

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    1. David Glasner would be great too.

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    2. I've never heard Glasner speak. It would be fascinating to hear the voice behind such excellent prose, although it might be disappointing--not all good writers are so eloquent in real-time.

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  9. I think you should get Matthew Rognlie to talk about his critic on Pikkety's Kapital.

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  10. Paul Krugman - to talk about his 1998 paper, of course!

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  11. Great podcast. Scott Sumner is a unique (in this day and age of the internet) combination of clarity, matter-of-fact persuasiveness, and modesty.

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